Architecture

Reprinted with permission from the Historic Preservation Commission


Architectural styles in the Chapin Park National Register Historic District include Gothic Revival, Queen Anne, Second Empire, Shingle, Prairie, Tudor Revival, and American Foursquare. The district is notable for the integrity of building styles; quality of workmanship and architectural detail; integrity of use and scale; and for its distinctive street furniture, red-brick streets, Victorian lamp-posts and lushly wooded lawns, some of which are surrounded by wrought-iron fences.

In addition to the homes referenced in the history section, other significant residential structures here include: 720 Park Avenue, a Stick Style structure built in 1878 for James Dushane, co-founder of South Bend Electric Company; 417 West Navarre, a three-story Queen Anne residence with an engaged-tower, built in 1890; and 801 Park Avenue, a Late Gothic Revival structure built in 1885.

The twentieth century is well represented; 730 Park Avenue, an award-winning Colonial Revival house designed by Ernest Young, built in 1911; 308 Lamonte Terrace, a fine example of the Prairie style from 1912 designed by Austin and Shambleau; and 708 North Lafayette, another good Prairie example, designed by Ernest Young and constructed in 1916.

Architectural Styles

 

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  • This style, popular in the mid-to-late 19th century, was influenced by medieval church architecture in England, France and Germany.
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  • More generally referred to as Victorian, the Queen Anne style is characterized by asymmetry and frivolity.
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  • The Tudor style is loosely based on a variety of early English building traditions ranging from simple folk houses to Late Medieval palaces.
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  • The Colonial Revival style became popular in the late nineteenth century. It draws its inspiration from Georgian Colonial architecture.
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  • The American Foursquare was a post-Victorian style which shared many features with the Prairie architecture pioneered by Frank Lloyd Wright.
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  • The Second Empire style was influenced by Parisian architecture of the 1850s and 60s, including a sloping "mansard" roof.
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  • The Prairie style was developed after 1900 as a building type that answered the particular conditions of the Midwest.
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  • This American style resembles Queen Anne style architecture, with less ornamental detail and a more horizontal structure.
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  • The Stick style is rather a subdivision of the Queen Anne, having the same two-story informally arranged parts.
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